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Sunday, March 01, 2020

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Perhaps commonest context in IELTS might be in Task 1, where it would be normal to write "the data given", or "the information provided", rather than putting the adjective/participle before the noun.
In task 2, "for the reasons outlined above", or "for the reasons given" might be useful. See usage graph:
https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=the+information+provided%2C+the+provided+information%2C+the+data+given%2C+the+given+data%2C+the+chart+provided%2C+the+provided+chart%2C+the+graph+provided%2C+the+attached+information%2C+the+*_NOUN+attached%2C+*_NOUN+provided%2C+*_NOUN+given&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cthe%20information%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20provided%20information%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20data%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20given%20data%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20chart%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20graph%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20attached%20information%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Cthe%20%2A_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bthe%20importance_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20meaning_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20value_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20muscles_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20property_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20duties_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20conditions_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20interest_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20stigma_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthe%20penalties_NOUN%20attached%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bmanner_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bservices_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Binformation_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bhereinafter_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Blaw_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BAct_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bspace_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bact_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bdata_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bfunds_NOUN%20provided%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bname_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Baccount_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Binformation_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bdescription_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Breasons_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Binstructions_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Breason_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bpower_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bfigures_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bevidence_NOUN%20given%3B%2Cc0

Is it correct if I assume there is adjective clause between the noun and the adjective followed by?

For example:
someone important -> someone who/that is important
the person responsible -> the person who is responsible

Crystal,

Yes, that's the best way to understand what's happening.

Just remember that you can't always do this with adjectives. For example, you can't say "the car red", even if you mean "the car that is red".

The examples in the lesson above (and other similar examples) are relatively unusual in the English language.

Hi Simon
I want to take the IELTS test one month later and my grammar is awful. How can I improve my grammar as soon as possible?
regards

Hi Simon, could you give me example for each situation that you give?

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