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Thursday, August 23, 2018

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The bar chart compare the six categories of American people who have meals in fast food restaurants between 2003and 2013.
It is clear that the frequecies for "once a week" and "once or twice a month"are the major chices for Americans who have meals out of home. The percentages for "eating outside everday"and "never did so" remained stable over the ten years for concerned.
In 2003,17% of American people chose to visit fast food restaurant several times a week,which was just half as much as the figures for their counterparts who did so once a week and once or twice a month(31% and 30% respectively).
2006 saw an increase in the percentages of several times a week (nearly 5%)and once a week in restaurants (reaching its peak at 33%), but witnessed a drop of almost 8% in the number of once or twice a month . In 2013, Americans' most frequent pattern to restaurant was once or twice a month at about 33% while the figures for several times a week and once a week were reduced by nearly 5%.
With regard to other three frequencies,the perentagesof "Never" and "Every Day"were all less than 5% during the whole ten years. As for the figure of "a few times a year",it was about 13% at first in 2003 and remained stable at 15 % in the rest period.


Overall trend in the bar chart provides information about that the majority of Americans (95%) eating outside and this trend is unchanged over 10 years. (Between 2013-2013)

The overall trend ends with a shift toward eating fast food less frequently. The incidence of the median cohort has halved.

The bar chart illustrates the figure of the frequency of US people choosing eat out from 2003 to 2013.
It is noticeable that the frequent patterns of once a week and once or twice a month were the major habit over the period of time. Besides, the percentage of US population who refer to visit restaurant once or twice a month decreased in 2006, while this figure increased significantly in 2013.

Claire

1) The bar chart compares

2) "the six categories": which categories? None have been mentioned so far, so no article.

-> The chart shows .... , divided into six categories (according to frequency).

3) There is a shift in frequencies over the period: the top frequency moves to once or twice per month. This trend needs to be mentioned in the overview.

4) The other overview item is that the results very roughly correspond to a bell-shaped curve, with the median around the two middle categories.

5) Once you have established the two main features in the overview, it pays to group the detail into two corresponding supporting paragraphs. Otherwise the detail tends to wander on and seem like a (Band 5) mechanically produced list with no focus. I would suggest reorganizing your final paragraph along these lines, so that the data is links back to the ideas in the overview.

The bar chart compares the frequency of Americans eating in fast food restaurants in 2003,2006,2013.

It is clear that American people ate outside once a week and once or twice a month mainly. by 2013, the major frequency of eating fast food was once or twice a month.

I think maybe my overviwe paragraph has some grammar problems, anyone so kind to give me advice? thanks a lot.

Dear Kata
Thanks for your advice. The fourth item you mentioned was to describe the changes in several times a week at overview patr, am I right?

@Claire

The overview needs to answer Simon's two questions:

A:(3) the overall trend was to eat at fast food restaurant less frequently

B:(4) around 60% of Americans ate out at fast food restaurants throughout the period at least once a month but not more than once a week.

We can then follow with a paragraph each giving supporting details.

My introduce for this table

(1) The table demonstrates the frequencies of/how often American people eating at fast food restaurants from 2003 to 2013.

(2) The table illustrates the percentage of Americans eating at fast food restaurants, divided into six categories according to a frequency between 2003 and 2013.

I think we should not use "eat out" instead of "eat at fast food restaurants", because "eat out" does not express very specifically what the table mentioned.

The chart above gives us information about frequency of eating at fast food restaurants among people living in the USA. It seems like people who eat at a fast food restaurant everyday has the lowest frequency from 2003 to 2013. It was followed by people who eat several times a week with 17% in 2003. This had dropped to 16% in 2013 so it’s obvious that the percentage did not change too much. The percentage of people eating at a fast food restaurant once a week reached peak at 30% in 2003 but it had dropped to 27% in 2013. So it appears that people were not likely to eat at fast food restaurants anymore. People eating once or twice a month is at 30% in 2003 but it has increased slightly by 2013 with 32%. since than there has been a dramatic decrease such that people eating at fast food restaurants a few times a year is at 14% in 2003 and 15% in 2013. The percentage of people never eat at a fast food restaurant is at between 4%-5% in all years.

@gk

Band 5: "recounts detail mechanically with no clear overview"

The bar chart gives information on how frequent people in the USA go to fast food restaurants between 2003 and 2013.

Generally, people eat at fast food restaurants more or less once a week over the period shown, and the percentage of people eating fast food on a daily basis is as much as those who never consume it.

In 2003, approximately 32% and 30% of Americans respectively ate fast food once a week and once or twice a month. This is about a quarter of a difference from those who consumed it daily and from those who did not. A similar trend can be seen in 2006 wherein there was an increase of about 3-5% on those who frequented fast food restaurants once a week and several times a week. Daily consumption and those who do not go to fast food restaurants remained the lowest, at less than 5 percent.

Over the next ten years, in 2013, people in the US had notably lessened going to fast food restaurants. With the same percentage of people going once a week in 2006, it had gone less frequent by just once or twice a month in 2013 (around 33%). The percentage of US people going to fast food restaurants every day, several times a week and those who refrain from it had been consistently low at 15 percent and below.

@timothy

1) If the graph or chart is about the past, then the past simple would normally be the tense to use. See Simon's comments here:

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2017/06/ielts-writing-task-1-verb-tenses.html

->The bar chart shows how frequently people in the USA went to ...
->Generally, people ate
->those who did not
-> was consistently low

2) Band 7 specifies "presents a clear overview of main trends, differences or stages", so we need to point out the overall trends in the overview.

3) "Generally, people eat at fast food restaurants more or less once a week ": not true. Less than thirty percent did that in 2013.

4) In my view the key features to mention in the overview are:

a) The frequencies show a "normal distribution" evenly centered around the middle two cohorts. That is, nearly sixty percent of Americans fell into the once-a-week or once-to-twice-per-month categories.

b) There was a trend for frequencies to drop by the end of the period, and the distribution is skewed right.

http://asq.org/learn-about-quality/data-collection-analysis-tools/overview/histogram2.html

A glance at the bar chart reveals the different changes in habit of using fast food among American people over the period of 10 years from 2003 to 2013. In addition, the frequency of using fast food is compared in 6 different levels ranging from never to everyday.
It is apparent from the information supplied that there is a vast amount of American people using fast food once a week in 2003 and 2006. This figure increased slightly from over 30% to approximately 34% in the three years later. The percentage of people in this category, however, fall down to the vicinity of 27% in 2013. The largest portion in this year, meanwhile, was taken by the rate of people using fast food once or twice a week.
In stark contrast, the rate of people who use fast food every day is the lowest figure in all 3 years according to this diagram. Obviously, a decade from 2003 to 2013 saw a sharply decrease from roundly 4% to a mere of 3% of American using fast food every day.

JAMESMT

1) "A glance at the bar chart": see below:

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2018/08/ielts-writing-task-1-students-questions.html#comments

2) "Incidence" is a useful word for Task 1, and has a more objective nuance than "habit". https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/incidence
-> The bar chart shows the incidence of eating out in fast food restaurants ...

3) https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=over+the+10-year+period%2Cover+the+ten+year+period%2Cover+the+decade+ending%2Cover+the+ten+years+to%2C+over+the+ten+years+ending&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cover%20the%20ten%20year%20period%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cover%20the%20decade%20ending%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cover%20the%20ten%20years%20to%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cover%20the%20ten%20years%20ending%3B%2Cc0

4) "In addition,... everyday." -> , divided into six categories/cohorts/groups

5) -> there were a vast number of American people
https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=%22there+are+a+vast+number+of+people%22&num=10

6) Where is the overview?? No clear overview = Band 5 for Task Achievement

7) "in the three years later." -> in the three years that followed/ in the following three years

JAMESMT

8) "fall down to the vicinity of ...."
-> dropped to somewhere in the vicinity of
https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/in-the-vicinity-of-ps3-million-1-500-2-billion-years-etc

9) "people using fast food": people use drugs, but eat food.

10) roundly -> approximately

The bar chart compares the incidence of Americans eating at fast food restaurant in 2003, 2006 and 2013 by 6 levels from "Every day" to "Never" according to frequency.

It presents a general normal distribution. Most people (approximately 60%) in the USA chose to eat fast food "once a week" or "once or twice a month" among this period, the percentage of which droped dramaticly with both increasing and decreasing of the frequency and was down to less than 5% when it was done on a daily basis or not at all.

In 2003, less than one out of five people ate junk food several times a week whereas the figure rose to 20% by 2006 and droped to 16% by 2010. Similarly, a slight increase (about 2%) has been seen in the percentage of people eating fast food once a week from 2003 to 2006 and a considerable (about 5 points) decrease from 2006 to 2013. In converse, at level "once/twice a month", it showes a U-shape, with 5 point dereases in the first 3 years and 8 point increases in the last 7 years. No significant changes were seen in category of "Every day", "A few times a year" and "Never".

In conclusion, the majority of people in the USA who ate at fast food restaurant did it once a week or once/twice a month from 2003 to 2013 and there reveals a lessened trend by the end of the period.

@ Whaly

1) If we are talking about a normal distribution or bell-shaped curve, the extremes at each side of the bell are referred to as "tails". The tails may be fat or thin, and the bell wide or skinny.

BTW, these statistical concepts are used when doing surveys to get the accuracy or confidence level (usually expressed as 'plus or minus x%'): see here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/68%E2%80%9395%E2%80%9399.7_rule

This means that we could write something like: both tails (of the distribution), that is, eating on a daily basis or not at all, were under 5% throughout the period.

2)Spelling:
dramatically : applies to adjectives ending in -ic
dropped : applies to many single syllable (older English) verbs which double the final consonant to indicate that the vowel remains short.
EG:
Plan -> planning (making plans)
Plane -> planing (a process to flatten wood)
drop -> dropping
droop -> drooping (a long vowel)
Some verbs have alternates:
travelled (British spelling)
traveled (American spelling)
focussed or focused: either seems okay

3) As far as the trend is concerned, try drawing a line connecting the points for 2003: it should look like a sand dune in section.
Then draw the line for 2006. The sand dune has moved left, so the trend up to this point is for people to eat out in fast-food places more often.
Finally, draw the sand dune for 2013. It has moved to the right, so the incidence is down across the board, below the opening level.
This is the trend that needs to be stated: more frequent (peaking) in 2006, and then tailing off in 2013. Then group the detail to support this view.

4) My overview would state that (a) sixty percent of Americans ate out in fast-food establishments throughout the period and (b) the chart shows a lower incidence at the end of the period surveyed.

"there reveals a lessened trend": not found on Google books. Use either:
c) The chart shows a downward trend, OR
d) There was a downward trend

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=*_ADJ+trend%2C+*+a+downward+trend&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2C%2A_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bgeneral_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bupward_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bdownward_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bnew_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsame_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bpresent_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsecular_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwhole_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcurrent_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Brecent_ADJ%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bof%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bon%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshowed%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshow%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshown%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bbeen%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshows%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwas%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwith%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20a%20downward%20trend%3B%2Cc0


@ Beyonce
Thank you so much for your advice. It helps a lot!

"Median" and "mode" are other useful terms for dealing with graphs or charts and enable us to focus on the "middle" value, particularly in a case such as this where we do not know the average or mean.

Thus, for example, something like:

At the start of the period, the mode (or commonest) frequency was weekly, applying to over thirty percent of Americans in 2003, and rising a couple of points by 2006.

By the end of the period, the mode, while still representing around a third of all Americans, had shifted to fortnightly/monthly, which betokens a significant fall-off in patronage.*

In terms of a bell-shaped curve, in 2006 the bell was fatter and the tails thinner, and by 2013 the reported customer count (distribution) was skewed toward the lower frequencies.

*Patronage = customer count

This chart showed the frequencies of eating fast food restaurant among people in the USA from 2003 to 2013 in six categories.
The percentage of people who ate out every day and” never” did it was below 5%. In terms of “ several times a week”, 20 % of people spent money on the restaurant in 2006 and slightly down in 2013, while “a few times a year” kept stably around 15% from 2003 to 2013. The highest percentage was “ Once a week”, especially in 2006 was more than 30%. A different picture happened while a significant number of people decided to cut down on fast food eating habit from once a week to once a month, making the monthly rate peak at 33% compared 28 % weekly rate.

@phuong

Your grammar is so bad.

@Phuong

Simon usually works through Task 1 step by step, and this process takes a few weeks. First, identify the main features. Then how to write the overview, and finally, writing the detail paragraphs. In the meantime it would be a good idea to look back through previous Task 1 questions and Simon's model answers and see how these steps play out. Click on the left-hand sidebar. The whole thing is very much about having a good approach, which will automatically improve your score.

SunP: I'm on the way to learn better. Thank you for your comment.
Beyonce: I will do as your advice and guidance. Thank you

Good job, Phuong!

The bar graph compares the percentage of consumption at fast food restaurants in six different frequency in the years 2003, 2006 and 2013.

It is noticeable that most American people consumed fast food weekly and monthly. However, American people reduced the intake of junk food over the period.

In 2003, the highest percentage of consuming fast food in the USA was once a week at approximately 32%, and the second was once or twice a month at 30%. However, there was a slight increase between 2003 to 2006 in the weekly consumption of fast food. Surprisingly, around 3% of the American population ate junk food every day, whereas less than 5% of people had never had fast food over the 10-year period.

The percentage of American people who ate junk food several times a week increased from 17% in 2003 to 20% in 2006, however, the figure was dropped by nearly 5% in 2013. In 2013, the weekly consumption of fast food decreased at about 27%, whereas there was a significant increase in monthly consumption of fast food at approximately 33%. Only about 15% of people ate junk food a few times a year over the period.

@Tae

1) "incidence" might be better than "percentage" here.

2) -> six different (frequency) groupings.

3) "most American people" (sounds like 80%) -> a majority of American people (sounds more like over half: "the majority" would suggest something like 80%)

4) "weekly and monthly": what about once a fortnight? -> at least once a month (and cover the detail later)

5) "the highest percentage of consuming fast food" -> the highest incidence of eating out at fast food establishments.

This is a long phrase and to avoid repeating it several times we could switch the sentences around and refer back to this phrase with "it", or "this":

First, set up the topic with a short general sentence:

a) The incidence of eating out at fast food establishments shows some variation over the years.

Then refer back using "It":

b) It was 32% in 2003 for the weekly category, and 30% for the once-or-twice-a-month category. OR The highest incidence was ....

Another approach is to set up the topic as people:

c) There are significant changes in the way Americans ate out at fast food restaurants over the period under review.

d) The highest incidence in 2003 was once a week at 32% .... In 2006 the incidence rose ...

In (d) the phrase "highest incidence" automatically implies "of American people eating out in fast food restaurants" by ellipsis. As long as we repeat the phrase "the incidence" it works as a substitution, and repeating this word will be perfectly fine.

6) "Surprisingly": this is your opinion/reaction and is not required: the report should be objective.

7) "junk food": this has a pejorative nuance and includes chips, and cookies.

8) "however," : this begins a new sentence.

9) decreased at about 27%, -> decreased to
increased at -> increased to (~33%)

The bar chart illustrates people eating fast food in six disparate frequency in the USA in the year 2003, 2006, 2013.

It is clear that the graph showed a normal distribution. Eating at fast food restaurants once a week and once or twice a month made up a huge proportion, while the percentage of consuming fast food every day and never in restaurants were considerably low during a decade.

The frequency of people visiting fast food restaurants once a week in 2003 and once or twice in 2013 were equal in the peak, which stood at roughly 33%. The chart shows a decline about 4% in once week of consumption fast food, whereas there were a slight increase, around 3%, in once or twice a month from 2003 to 2013, and it was noticeable that the percentage of the two bars summed up to approximately 60%.

Between 2006 and 2013, there were no changes in spending money on fast food for every day, a few time a year and never, which was 3%, 15%, and 4% respectively. The percentage of eating junk food several times a week was the third which merely decreased 1% high during the year of 2003 to 2013.

Roger:
1) "The bar chart illustrates people ": this sounds as if it is a painting of people eating in a restaurant, like this:

https://krollermuller.nl/en/vincent-van-gogh-the-potato-eaters-1

-> The bar chart illustrates the frequency of Americans eating out at fast food establishments in the years 2003, 2006, and 2013, divided according to six categories.

2) -> The graph roughly corresponds to a normal distribution. (It is not exact.)

3) If the overview is based on the bell-shaped curve of a normal distribution, then I would continue along the following lines:
... with the bulk of the population featuring in/centered around the weekly, fortnightly, and monthly categories. The distribution tails at the extremes are fatter than normal.

(This is quite an accurate overview, but assumes both you and the examiner have the prerequisite statistical background.)

4) The overview needs to also mention the trend. Refer to Beyonce's comments above.

5) "there were a slight increase": verb should be singular.

6) All fast food is not junk food, and all junk food is not fast food.

7) Better to select the detail to support your assertions in the overview. That is choose the detail to show the trend, and group your narrative as such. Then deal with the extremes, and the median data.

@Bogdan

Thank you for your opinion about my writing.
It seems to me that I have to think about more detail and meaning of the words. And I will try to use 'it', 'this' and ' incidence' in my writing.
I will rewrite the task again.
Thank you.

The bar chart provided illustrates the frequency of USA citizens ate in fast food restaurants between 2003 and 2013. In general, it is clear that the majority of people ate fast food once a week during 2003 and 2006, and once or twice a month in 2013. However, the minority of people preferred fast food every day during the period.

Looking at the data in more detail, the people who consume fast food once or twice a month dropped from 30% to 25% during the first three years and then rose dramatically to 33% in 2013. People chose to consume few times a year also have an upward trend. From about 13% in 2003 to 15% in 2006, and maintain the same figure in 2013. In contrast, consumer visited fast food restaurants several times a week or once a week also received downward trend. The former dropped slightly from about 17% to 16%. The latter decreased from about 31% to about 27%. Although both of them have increased in 2006, the main trend decreased. Turning to the rest of the two groups, the Americans who never ate this food and those consumed every day both dropped by 1% during the first period and then stayed at the same level in 2013.

Katy

a) ... the majority ate ...
However, a minority preferred ....

(no need to repeat 'of people': it is implied)
There were a number of minorities including "never", and 'a few times a year', so we must use 'a' in the sense of 'one of them'.

b) People who chose to consume a few times a year also

c) "People ... have an upward trend."
Not found on Google books. It would perhaps suggest they are becoming less stooped. See the graph below for the common collocations with "upward trend": 'have' is not one of them

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=*+an+upward+trend%2C*+on+an+upward+trend%2C+*+is+an+upward+trend&year_start=1920&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2C%2A%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bshowed%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshow%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bof%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshown%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bon%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshows%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bis%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bbeen%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwas%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshowing%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bbeen%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bis%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwas%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwere%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bare%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcontinued%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bbe%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcontinue%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bstill%20on%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A%20is%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bthere%20is%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BThere%20is%20an%20upward%20trend%3B%2Cc0

-> There was also an upward trend in the number of people who chose to consume a few times a year.

d) ... the incidence of consumers visiting fast food restaurants several times a week was on an upward trend

e) "have increased in 2006" : generally, use past simple with specific dates and times. Cf:

Have you seen John this year? (period up till now)
Did you see John last year? (a finished period)

f) "the main trend decreased." : I am lost; what was the main trend?

g) Turning to the remaining two groups,

h) There was an overall trend toward eating out (in fast food places) less frequently over the whole period under review. This was not made clear in either the overview or the detail. So change them accordingly.

STARTING THE OVERVIEW

Band 7 states: "presents a clear overview of main trends,differences or stages".

One simple way to start the overview would thus be to use one of these key words. For example:

The main trend was (for people to eat out less often).

There was a trend toward (eating out more often)

There were two key differences: ....

There were six main stages ....

Common collocations with "trend":

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=trend+has+*_VERB%2C%2Ctrend+toward+*%2Ctrend+is+for+*%2C+trend+is+in+*&year_start=1920&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2Ctrend%20has%20%2A_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20been_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20continued_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20become_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20developed_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20changed_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20emerged_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20led_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20occurred_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20reversed_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20has%20resulted_VERB%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Ctrend%20toward%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20the%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20a%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20more%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20greater%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20increased%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20increasing%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20an%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20higher%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20larger%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20toward%20centralization%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Ctrend%20is%20for%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20the%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20a%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20more%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20an%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20these%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20them%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20this%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20people%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20all%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20for%20increasing%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Ctrend%20is%20in%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20the%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20that%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20this%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20favor%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20line%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20evidence%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20a%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20agreement%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20part%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20is%20in%20favour%3B%2Cc0

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=trend+in+the+*%2Ctrend+of+the+*&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2Ctrend%20in%20the%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20United%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20direction%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20number%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20data%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20development%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20world%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20last%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20rate%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20past%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20in%20the%20ratio%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Ctrend%20of%20the%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20times%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20data%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20past%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20market%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20time%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20last%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20future%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20economy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20world%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btrend%20of%20the%20coast%3B%2Cc0

More on trend:

Strictly speaking, 'trend' is about the average line between three or more points. It is therefore wrong to use it when referring to two points: use 'increase/decrease/rise/fall' instead.

The bar chart compares six different categories of American people who eat meal at fast food restaurant between 2003 and 2013.

Overall, a large frequency of people eating outside was once a week and once or twice a month in a decade and the proportion of people eating out everyday and never were stable over the period.

In 2003 ,17 percent of people preferred fast food several time in a week which was half of the figure of people who did so once a week and once or twice a month that is 31%and 30 % respectively. visit a few times in a year was 14%. There was 5 percent of people were not interested to ate out.

In 2006 and 2013 , percentage of people eating out everyday ,a few time a week and never were similar ( 3% , 15 % and 4 %). 20% of American citizen ate fast food in 2006 time a week and 33 % once a week. there was a gradual fall 25% in the frequency of natives eating twice month. In 2013, Americans frequently visit to restaurant was once or twice a month ( reaching its peak at 33%). while data for several times a week or once a week were reduced to 5%.

Jagdeep kaur

1) 'meal' without an article means something else:
https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/meal

2) at fast food restaurants: use plural when generalizing with countable nouns

3) 'eating outside': means al fresco. 'Eat out' is a phrasal verb means to eat at a restaurant as opposed to eating in (at home) or getting a takeaway.

4) 'the proportion .... was'

5) -> several times a week

6) ->the figure for people

7) ....twice a month, that is, 31% ... (note the commas)

8) -> The category for visiting a few times a year was 14%.

9) -> Five percent of people were not interested in eating out. (This is an unwarranted interpretation: perhaps they actually were interested but could not afford it.)

10) -> the percentage of people

11) 20% of American citizen -> Twenty percent of American citizens.

12) 'natives': from thefreedictionary.com : "When used in reference to a member of an indigenous people, the noun native, like its synonym aborigine, can evoke unwelcome stereotypes of primitiveness or cultural backwardness that many people seek to avoid. As is often the case with words that categorize people, the use of the noun is more problematic than the use of the corresponding adjective."

13) 'In 2013, Americans frequently visit... ': tense!!!!

14) -> ...at 33%), while data ... : requires comma before 'while' not full stop/period

The chart describes percentage of frequency of people consumption in ain fast food restaurant in USA from 2003-2013.

Overall, big number of people in USA went to fast food restaurant in once a week and once or twice in a month from 2003-2013. And small number went to restauran everyday or never.

Jojo

"people consumption" suggests cannibalism.

-> frequency of people eating out at fast food restaurants

Thanks Lolita.

Here my essay:

The chart describes frequency of people eating out at fast food restaurant in three different years (2003,2006, and 2003).
Overall, big number of people went to fast food restaurant once a week or one/twice a month. In contrary, small number of population ate on fast food restaurant everyday or never.
The number of US people experienced fast food everyday in 2006 as same as in 2013. The number was about 2,5%. And in 2003, only below 5% people ate fast food. The number people ate fast food everyday almost same with the number of people that never went to fast food restaurant. In 2003, the number was 5%. And In 2006 and 2013, people that never went to fast food restaurant was about 4%.
In 2006, people ate in fast food restaurant once a week reached the peak. The number was about 33% as same as people ate fastfood once or twice a month in 2013.In 2003, number of people ate once a week almost same with people ate once or twice a month.


@ Jojo

Well, that is a start.

I suggest you check out Sandi's comments re 'trend' above, and Beyonce's advice to Phuong.

To me, your final paragraph is just a recital of figures. What is needed is to select and group the data so that it ties in with, and supports, the main features outlined in the overview.

@ Jojo

'Big' is a tricky word, as in some meanings it is viewed as informal, and therefore not a word that should appear in Task 1, and probably not in Task 2.

See where it is marked 'informal' here:

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/big

The simplest approach is not to use it at all in IELTS, except possibly in part 1 Speaking.

The bar chart compares the frequency of American people eating fast food from year 2003 to 2013.
It is clear that more Americans would like to have fast food once a week or once/twice per month.We can also see that Americans experienced a tendency to eat in fast food restaurant less frequently.
In 2003, over 30% of Americans ate in fast food restaurant, ranking highest amongst 6 frequencies, and in 2006, this proportion raised to approximately 33%. In the same period, percentage of those ate once or twice a month showed a decrease from 30% to 25%. But in 2013, proportion of people having fast food at that frequency became the highest, at about 33%, followed by those eat once a week and several times a week.
Those who eat every day and never eat showed a declining trend from 2003 to 2006 and remained almost the same till 2013, at 3% and 4% respectively. By contrast, people eating at frequency at a few times a year saw an increase from nearly 12% in 2003 to 15% in 2006 and also sustained that figure in 2013.

Given is the data about the figures for Americans consumed at fast food restaurants during the period of time from 2003 to 2013.

Generally, it is noticeable that the whole bar chart presents a rough bell-shaped curve. In the middle of the curve, we can easily find that over 60 percent American people tended to have food at fast food restaurants weekly and once or twice a month; also, the main population eating outside exchanged with each other. Besides, both tails indicate that people in America eating outside everyday or never consuming outside remained stable in that 10 years.

In 2003, about 31 percent Americans ate out of home once a week, while approximately 30 percent American people used to consume at fast food restaurant fortnightly or monthly. However, in 2013, Americans fond of eating outside decreased to about 28 percent, whereas some 33 percent Americans preferred having food outside once or twice a month.

In 2003, the numbers of people in America always and never ate outside were approximately 4 and 5 percent respectively. In 2006 and 2013, only 3 and 4 percent separately Americans tended to eat outside and eat at home.

David

1) 'eating fast food': this would include takeaways, whereas the chart specifies eating out (ie in a restaurant).

2) 'would like': no, the chart is not about their wishes, preferences and dreams. It is about what actually took place, hard facts.

3) 'experienced a tendency': no, that sounds as if they were passive victims, whereas they in fact made active choices. -> chose

Or: There was a trend over the period for them to eat out less often.

4) 'ate out of home': 'eat out' is a phrasal verb

5) 'while approximately 30 percent American people used to consume at fast food restaurant fortnightly or monthly. ' -> and about thirty percent fortnightly or monthly. (Use ellipsis.)

6) ' fond of', 'preferred': same as (3) above.

7) 'having food outside': means al fresco, which can be done in the park, by the beach, or in your own backyard.

8) Final paragraph muddled. Something like:
The figure for those in the 'never' category fell from five percent in 2003 to four percent in 2006 and 2013. Likewise, the 'always' category dropped from ....

Jacky

1) 'Given is the data about': nice try, but it does not crop up on Google books, so do not use it for IELTS.

2) ' the main population eating outside exchanged with each other. ': not clear. Did you mean: there was a trend toward eating out at fast food establishments less frequently.

3) 'Besides,': no, not right in this context. You'll have to check the dictionary and use google books.

4) 'eating outside ' = al fresco -> eating out

Oh dear! I've got Jacky and David muddled: sorry guys. You'll have to sort it yourselves.

The given bar graph illustrates how often people from 2003 to 2013 ate in fast food hotels in the USA.

Overall, it is apparent from the graph that majority of the Americans ate in fast food hotels on weekly basis or twice a month in all three years. However, number of those who went there every single day was relatively the least.

In 2003, 31% of people went to fast food hotels on weekly basis, and this increased to 33% in 2006 but decreased again in 2013 by 5%. Whereas, figure for those who went to these hotels once or twice a month was 30% in 2003, but over the next 10 years this figure rose to 33%, a difference of 3% in 10 years.

By contrast, the frequency of people in the USA who preferred fast food restaurants several times a week was 17% in 2003 and that showed a growth of 3% in 2006 but after the next 7 years, it declined again reaching at 16%. For people who went there a few time a year, the figure was same, at 15% for the year 2006 and 2013. Finally, those who consumed fast food every single day or those who did not eat at all in these hotels, the percentage was below 6.

The bar chart shows fast food eating habits of Americans from 2003 to 2013. Overall, “once a week” and “once or twice a month” are the major frequency of USA people come to fast food restaurants and it is unchanged during 10 years. However, there was a slight shift toward consuming less junk food in 2013.
In 2003, over 30% of Americans went to fast food restaurant one time per week and a slgihtly lower percentage of people chose once or twice a month. More than 15% of customers ate fast food more frequently that is several times a week and it was 10% higher comparing to those who rarely bought this quickly served products.Only 5% of people committed that they had never consuming junk food and there was a simlilar number to those eating it daily.
During next 10 years, both the prevalance of people who eat fast food everyday and who never eat fast food had decreased minimally and then remained unchanged at less than 5%. Meanwhile, in 2006, Americans consumed convenient food more frequently which is revealed by the increase in the group of people who eat fast food once a week and several times a weak to peak at a third and a fifth, coresspondingly. However, from 2006 to 2013, those who eat fast food at least one time per week declined while “once or twice a month” customers increased and took the highest rank in 2013 with about 33%.

tkb

The given bar graph[this phrase is not found on Google Books] illustrates how often people from 2003 to 2013[suggests people born between these dates] ate in fast food hotels[hotel is somewhere you sleep] in the USA.

... in fast food hotels[!!] ... However,[missing article] number ...

on [missing article] weekly basis... Whereas,[not followed by comma: is a conjunction not an adverb] figure ... the next 10 years [decade]

... preferred [they may not prefer them; just be travelling and have no alternative]..there a few time[singular/plural] a year, ...hotels[establishments],

Comment: The overview fails to identify trends: select the data that supports your assertions in the overview and group accordingly.

Long

Leave a blank line between paragraphs so that the examiner can immediately identify them. Paragraphing is important for a good score in Coherence and Cohesion.
[]
Overall, “once a week” and “once or twice a month” are the major frequency[singular/plural] of USA people come[eating out at] to fast food restaurants and it is unchanged during[missing article] 10 years. ...
In 2003, over 30% of Americans went to fast food restaurant[singular/plural] one time per week[once a week] and a slgihtly[spelling] lower percentage of people chose once or twice a month. More than 15% of customers ate fast food more frequently [missing comma]that is[missing comma] several times a week and it was 10% higher comparing[-ed] to those who rarely bought this quickly served products[unnecessary paraphrase: compared to those in the ? category: better not to paraphrase the labels in Task 1 as it is confusing and accuracy is paramount in Task 1].[missing space]Only[this is an undesired and unwarranted opinion; Task 1 must be objective] 5% of people committed[reported] that they had never consuming[malformed] junk food [do not paraphrase: junk food !== fast food]and there was a simlilar[spelling] number to those eating it daily.
During next 10 years, both the prevalance[spelling] of people who eat fast food everyday and [those] who never eat fast food had[tense error] decreased minimally and then remained unchanged at less than 5%. Meanwhile, in 2006, Americans consumed convenient[convenience] food[convenience food would include prepackaged food from supermarkets: do not paraphrase terminology in Task 1] more frequently which is revealed by the increase in the group of people who eat fast food once a week and several times a weak[spelling] to peak at a third and a fifth, coresspondingly[spelling -> respectively]. However, from 2006 to 2013, those who eat fast food at least one time per week declined[missing comma] while “once or twice a month” customers increased and took the highest rank in 2013 with about 33%.

thankyou sooooo much Csaj :)

omg, ty you so much for pointing out my error Csaj. I need to improve a lot.

Kindly If you please correct this for me

As we can see the bar chat gives information about the average of the people in the USA who ate junk food in restaurants during the period from 2003 to 2013. The are six categories of meals which are measured in frequencies.

Overall, in 2006 and 2013 as the frequencies; once a week and once or twice a month reached a peak nearly with a rate of 33%.

The frequency " every day" decreased sharply in 2003 with a rate of 2%. However, in 2013 and 2003 they were equal nearly with a rate of 3%.

The rate of the American people who ate fast food in 2003, 2006 and 2013 fell sharply with percentage 0% and 4%.

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