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Sunday, June 24, 2018

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thanks a lot simon.

It seems "something for the rainy day" may be an American aberration which cropped up in a few American publications in the first half of the twentieth century.

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=save+something+for+rainy+days%2Csomething+for+the+rainy+day%3Aeng_us_2012%2C+something+for+the+rainy+day%3Aeng_gb_2012%2C+&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Csomething%20for%20the%20rainy%20day%3Aeng_us_2012%3B%2Cc0

https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=Ui1CAQAAIAAJ&q=%22save+something+for+the+rainy+day%22&dq=%22save+something+for+the+rainy+day%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwitirGAj-zbAhVS_GEKHV-CDOAQ6AEITTAI

https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=v7cqAAAAMAAJ&q=%22save+something+for+the+rainy+day%22&dq=%22save+something+for+the+rainy+day%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwitirGAj-zbAhVS_GEKHV-CDOAQ6AEISTAH

https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=yHgXAQAAMAAJ&q=%22something+for+the+rainy+day%22&dq=%22something+for+the+rainy+day%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjc4oq5juzbAhVDzmEKHeA7D0AQ6AEILzAC

Hi Simon and everyone here,

I'd like to add something interesting here,.. You know there's a similarity among all different cultures around the world,, as in our local tradition(in Libya), we say:
"Save your white penny for a black day"..
This saying induces us to set some money aside for bad circumstances likely to happen!!

Thank you for this lesson!!
Ali M.

Sir, thanks for correction.

The most common versions of this idiom are:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=*+away+for+a+rainy&year_start=1870&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2C%2A%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bput%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsomething%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bmoney%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bit%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Blaid%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bhim%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Btucked%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bbit%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bstored%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Blittle%20away%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=*+saving+for+a+rainy%2C+*+save+for+a+rainy&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2C%2A%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bof%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bbeen%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Babout%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bin%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bare%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bwas%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bnot%20saving%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A%20save%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bto%20save%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bnot%20save%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20save%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bshould%20save%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bor%20save%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=*+aside+for+a+rainy&year_start=1870&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2C%2A%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bsomething%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bput%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bset%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Blaid%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bmoney%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bit%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Banything%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Blittle%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bputting%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsome%20aside%20for%20a%20rainy%3B%2Cc0

Ali M

Although "for a black day" is also the idiom in some Slavonic languages, other European languages are more mundane and just talk about "against hard times". Rainy days seem to be bad news in England but would be good news in some dry or desert countries.

Where There's a will There's a way, should I need to use Capital "T".

@ Lewis

Not necessarily:

https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=2810DQAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22where+there%27s+a+will+there%27s+a+way%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiNld7uk_DbAhWLdd4KHfACCGc4KBC7BQhUMAg#v=onepage&q=%22where%20there's%20a%20&f=false

https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=XxC9DgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22where+there%27s+a+will+there%27s+a+way%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiFnIrtkvDbAhWNQd4KHf5WDGw4HhC7BQhIMAU#v=onepage&q=%22where%20there's%20a%20will&f=false

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