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Saturday, May 19, 2018

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Please help!!!
In IELTS, number of myths hold a strong position and most of the IELTS trainers are very rigid regarding certain things like using synonyms. They force us to find new synonyms for almost every word, and honestly this is very irritating.
Please tell me if I can write following synonyms for already perfect words:
People = Masses, Rabble, Homo Sapiens
Increase = Incline (in task 1)
Decrease = decline
Staggering rate (just to tell difference between two different Values in task 1)

Simon,
I have developed two ways of concession and refutation which needs your assessment. I am not talking about whether there are some grammatical errors in the paragraphs below. What I wonder is whether I can use these two methods of concession and refutation in IELTS writing after one or two supporting ideas in a strong answer. Thanks in advance.
The topic is: Is watching TV positive or negative to children?


Admittedly, a minority of individuals tend to believe that watching TV programs inevitably has several drawbacks, one of which is detrimental influence on kids' academic studying because long-time watching TV programs, especially those soap operas, will easily lead to students’ addiction to the plot development. In this way, children’s attention will not be fully paid to academic courses in school. However, those people have oversimplified the real situations as some effective measures have been taken by parents such as taking a strict control of time that is spent in watching TV. Therefore, watching TV will not cause serious problem to children’s school learning.


Admittedly, a minority of people tend to believe that watching TV will have obvious merits, one of which is the opportunity to achieve abundant up-to-date information and knowledge because various TV programs contain a wide range of fields such as economy, culture and entertainment. However, if we can view such a situation from a different perspective, we can find that those people oversimplified the real situations. For example, violence and pornography are frequently shown on TV screens, which will certainly misguide children. Therefore, the provision of a sea of information will not be justified.

@AZ

"People" and "someone" are neutral words.

However "homo sapiens" is technical, and includes neanderthals and other proto-humans. https://www.google.com/search?q=%22homo%20sapiens%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Homo_sapiens

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/homo-sapiens

"The masses" smacks of communist ideological terminology, and refers to people of a lower class, with a hint of disdain, so not what you need.

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/mass_1#mass_1__101

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/the-masses

"Rabble" refers to a noisy or disorderly crowd who may be violent or of a lower social standing (again with disdain).

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/rabble?q=rabble

That is why you should not use these words unless the context demands it.

@AZ

"incline" does not mean "to increase".

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/incline

"decline" seems fine.

"staggering" suggests surprise or amazement, which involves a subjective judgement, so is not wanted in task 1, which is purely descriptive.

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/staggering

Lucy Chan:

For IELTS purposes, there is nothing wrong with the idea that violence and pornography on TV have an injurious effect, or the idea that there needs to be a balance between time spent watching TV and doing homework.

IELTS is a test of your English, so it is about your ability to put your ideas across clearly. Provided your ideas and arguments are relevant and answer the question, and the examples used support your position, there is no judgement on your views or standpoint: there is no "right" answer.

Thanks @ MOJO for the help :)
After understanding this difference, I'm happy that I'm on the right track :)

Hi everyone. is there anybody who takes an IELTS exam on May 24?

Can you rate this please and make corrections?


Many say that, it is not recommended for a company to retire it’s employees once they reach certain age. I, however, disagree with that idea and strongly believe that old aged stuffs need to be replaced with younger workers despite the difference in work experience.

First and foremost, elderly workers out of date. They might have enough experience when it comes to dealing with old machines and technology but they don’t usually get enough time to upgrade their knowledge and skills, whereas, younger workers know how to operate modern technology such as computers and thus they are able to increase productivity.

Secondly, large majority of older workers tend to get tired easily, mainly due to the fact that human body has certain limits so elderly workers need to take rest every two to three hours. Furthermore, young company workers are able to function nonstop, some times 6 to 7 hours straight.

Finally, opportunities given younger people by certain companies are very limited. They do so in order to keep expenses low. This has negative impact on young graduates from universities causing them dis moral and at certain levels increases the crime rate because of lack of employment.

To conclude, I pen down saying that, companies need to retire their elderly worldwide and employ young workers to improve productivity, have upto date workers and encourage young individuals to build successful career.

I've no clue which one is correct!

Due to high volume of inquiries...
Due to THE high volume of inquiries...
Due to A high volume of inquiries...

@Hessam

In the early stages of learning English, teachers often simplify, and so we learn that some nouns are countable, and others are not. Unfortunately this is not the whole truth; there are many nouns that can be either, depending on the context, and "volume" is one of them.

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/uncountable

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/countable

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/volume

So in a sentence such as: "volume is measured in cubic centimeters", it is uncountable, that is, we are looking at the concept or idea of volume in general. In this case it does not require an article; it is a generalization. The same applies in the sentence "life is beautiful".

The phrase "a/the volume of" is rather like a quantifier, or "measure" word. Measure words are sometimes used to count stuff, for example, "a piece of advice", "a packet of cigarettes", "a box of chocolates". Compare with: "the rate of..", "a number of..", "a lot of..". These measure words are countable so an article or similar is needed.

A vs THE
"The" originally had a similar meaning to "that", so is used where the reader is expected to already know which/what is being referred to, or a specific situation in question.

"A high volume of inquiries" is less specific, and so would more likely be used in generalizations.

https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=%22a+high+volume+of+inquiries%22&num=10

https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=%22the+high+volume+of+inquiries%22&num=10

Rurad

It is difficult to comment where we do not know what the question was.

The grammar around "recommend" is quite tricky. See

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/recommend

I do not see the pattern: "it is not recommended for someone to + infinitive".

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22it%20is%20not%20recommended%20for%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22it%20is%20not%20recommended%20that%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22it%20is%20not%20recommended%20to%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en

Notice that in the pattern "recommend that someone + VERB", the 's' on the present tense e is sometimes left off. The explanation for this is very long indeed.

There is a difference between "it's" and "its".

"old aged stuffs": might sound derogatory.

" elderly workers out of date": needs a verb.

"don’t": do not use short forms in formal writing.

"whereas, ": the punctuation is the same as "but"; it is not followed by a comma.

"to take a rest"
This has negative impact:
successful career:
singular countable nouns require an article or similar.

-> to become demoralized

"I pen down saying that": "pen down" usually means to put into writing or take notes.

Just a thought for you: how did computers get programmed years ago if no-one had the skill set? Is Bill Gates elderly?

After correction:

Some people argue that it is not wise for an industry to replace its experienced but old workers with new and young yet inexperienced individuals.
To what extent do you agree or disagree

Many say that, it is not good for a company to retire it’s employees once they reach certain age. I, however, disagree with that idea and strongly believe that old aged workers need to be replaced with younger ones despite the difference in work experience.

First and foremost, elderly workers are probably out of date. They might have enough experience when it comes to dealing with old machines and technology but they don’t usually get enough time to upgrade their knowledge and skills, whereas younger workers know how to operate modern technology such as computers and thus they are able to increase productivity.

Secondly, large majority of older workers tend to get tired easily, mainly due to the fact that human body has certain limits so elderly workers need to take a rest every two to three hours. Furthermore, young company workers are able to function nonstop, some times 6 to 7 hours straight.

Finally, opportunities given younger people by certain companies are very limited. They do so in order to keep expenses low. This has negative impact on young graduates from universities causing them to become demoralized and at certain levels increases the crime rate because of lack of employment.

In conclusion, I think companies need to retire their elderly worldwide and employ young workers to improve productivity, have upto date workers and encourage young individuals to build a successful career.

Rurad

"experienced but older workers employees"

As the graph below demonstrates, using the phrase "old people" has become distinctly unfashionable. It is now more polite to use the term "older people", or specify the age range. The same applies to "old" with other nouns referring to people. "Elderly" is fast falling out of fashion too, unless one wishes to imply senility, or physical/hearing/sight/movement impairment.

Band 8 is all about knowing "range of vocabulary fluently and flexibly to convey precise meanings". Getting this right is another step along the way.

Another word to avoid where possible in formal writing is "get", so we can change "to get tired easily" -> "tire easily".

I notice that you have not quite taken on board some of the points mentioned by Mojo above. It may be a long journey to success in IELTS but every step forward along the way matters in the long run.

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=older+people%2Cold+people%2Cold+workers%2Colder+workers%2Cold+employees%2Colder+employees%2C+elderly+workers%2C+elderly+people%2C+the+elderly&year_start=1900&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Colder%20people%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cold%20people%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cold%20workers%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Colder%20workers%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cold%20employees%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Colder%20employees%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Celderly%20workers%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Celderly%20people%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthe%20elderly%3B%2Cc0

I have italicized some other phrases for to to research yourself (just google them and find out what the correct version is):

"have upto date workers"

"to function nonstop,"

Nowadays artificial introduction is being used to drive cars. Why is this happening? Is it a positive or negative development?

My introduction

These days many latest vehicles are operated by artificial intelligence . This is due to the advancement in science and technology. In my opinion, it should be seen as a negative trend because robotics are more likely to make accidents than humans.

Hi, Simon. I wanna thank you for being such a great teacher through this website.

I took two prediction tests for this past 2 months. My first result for writing was only 5.5. But after spending one month studying from your website, I got 6 in the second attempt.

Thank you so much, Simon. I'll continue studying from this website to improve my score.

Good work kalvid. Keep going!

excuse me ,may i ask what do you mean by "sector of economy",i am confused with this phrase.Like" technology sector ",i guess it means clerks who codes or does creative work .

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