« IELTS Grammar: imagining something that doesn't exist | Main | IELTS Listening: do you have a daily listening habit? »

Monday, December 04, 2017

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

My favorite website is TED.com
You can approach a lot of information here.

Recently I have been interested with speeches of Simone Sinek that realted to empathy , leadership , side effect fot technology and social media .

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/smartphone-internet-addiction-phone-imbalance-brain-anxiety-tiredness-study-research-a8084146.html

hi Simon,
First of all thank you for this wonderful website.
I have a suggestion about website which contain reading topics depend on our interest.
Stumbleupon.com
First,people choose their interest and website bring the arcticles which related to them.
There are many interest on there and mobile application is available.

Dear Simon/sjm

Sorry if Im posting here,wondering whether we lose marks if we use a few idioms or phrases in our writings?

Thanks for your guidance and efforts.

Hello Simon and everyone,

I have a question. In listening, if the answer is singular (like Thursday) and for some unknown reason we write it in plural (Thursdays) do we lose marks?

@Sana

per Simon:

"topic vocabulary - words and phrases that are directly relevant to the specific topic of the question. This is the kind of vocabulary that impresses examiners."

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2013/11/ielts-vocabulary-idioms.html

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2017/07/ielts-writing-task-2-proverbs-and-idioms.html

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2011/11/ielts-advice-avoid-proverbs-and-clich%C3%A9s.html

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2011/12/ielts-vocabulary-topic-specific-vocabulary.html

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2011/07/ielts-advice-topic-vocabulary-is-the-key.html

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2015/02/ielts-advice-collocations-and-topic-vocabulary.html

http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2016/05/ielts-vocabulary-topic-list.html

If by "idioms" you mean phrases that are often used in academic writing, like "in terms of", or "account for", then these would be quite natural in Task 1 or 2.

If you mean topic-specific phrases such as "global warming", "inappropriate behavior/behaviour", then again very natural in the right context.

If you mean a portable idiom like "the lion's share", well, yes it comes up in books, but I am not sure whether an individual examiner would react favorably or not if used in Task 1; so why bother?

Re "the lion's share": this seems to suggest that the outcome is somehow unfair to the weaker parties, or there is an element of intimidation. That would make it hard to use correctly.

Recently, I have started reading "Sherlock Holmes".

It is interesting, but a little difficult for me, because some vocabularies are not familiar to me. Even though, reading it still delights me.

http://www.public-library.uk/dailyebook/Sherlock%20Holmes%20Complete.pdf

Thanks dear Kali,

I mean that for example if we use take it for granted or take with a grain of salt and so forth correctly in task 2, will we be penalized?

@Sana

The two phrases you mention crop up regularly in books.

The task 2 band descriptor states:

"uses a wide range of vocabulary with very natural and sophisticated control of lexical features".

So personally I do not see why you would be penalized if they truly fit the context; otherwise ...

But the main point is that Simon repeatedly states that it is topic-specific vocabulary and phrases that really matter.

@Sana

"the lion's share" is listed as a cliche here:

https://www.writingenglish.com/cliches.htm

"take it with a grain/pinch of salt" might well fall into that category too.

At the end of the day the fact of the matter is that, when all is said and done, and push comes to shove, in this day and age, in the final analysis, cliches like these might, to all intents and purposes, not help your score in the current climate !

Can you please share some links/sites where we can read comprehensive articles on latest happenings around the world.
I am not talking about news articles here as I think they use a very formal style and it doesnt quite feel like as we are reading a story or an argument in a flow.
So kindly tell us about where can we find understable and easy-to-follow content which would help yo improve our writing and reading both.

Thanks

Can you please share some links/sites where we can read comprehensive articles on latest happenings around the world.
I am not talking about news articles here as I think they use a very formal style and it doesnt quite feel like as if we are reading a story or an argument in a flow.
So kindly tell us about where can we find understable and easy-to-follow content which would help us to improve our writing and reading both.

Thanks

@Sehrish Taufeeq

I would suggest you persevere with well-written news articles, as the level of formality is roughly what is expected in IELTS reading and writing, although it takes time and persistent effort to acquire the vocabulary.

One possible source is:

https://www.theguardian.com/world

The sections on "development", "environment", "opinion" are especially worth-while and relevant. Bear in mind that the paragraphs have been broken up into shorter segments for ease of reading online.

Hi simon,
Thanks for sharing your methodical way to attack questions in IELTS.i have a question regarding reading GT section.
While practicing i found myself little slow.i found GT materials are lesser compared to academic.so can i practice them with timer for third section? Else pl suggest some way.

I need really good score n exams r scheduled for 16th dec.

Thanks in advance.

Divya

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name is required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)