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Friday, February 08, 2013

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Its very difficult to predict future, but I think we will see different types/designs of buldings.GOvernment will try to bouild more energy efficient building.We might see the buildings out of our imagination because achitectures try to make their name in the world with their design.probably one day every single thing in the house will be operated by technology.For example,escalators in normal terrace house instead of stairs.

The Chinese snake year is coming, happy new year Simon and everybody.

Hi Simon,

I am confused with these verbs :consist,constitute,and comprise.
Talking about diet for example,would you please tell me if I use them correctly?

A healthy diet is consisted of...
A healthy diet comprises...
A healthy diet is comprised of...
A healthy diet is constituted of...

Many thanks.

hello simon,
Still l havent got any respond.......
Regards
nisha

In the speaking test the examiner asked me : in part 1 :are you going to live in the area in the future?

and in part 3 there was a question : if you going to design equipment for the house , what are the most important criteria s ?

In today’s life there is no doubt that there is a tremendous rise in demand for home. This phenomenon has urged governments to ask architecture educational institutions and others for designing new dwellings to tackle the need of prospective buyers and residents.
The changes are firstly- The new standards
and guidance are intended to encourage
provision of enough space in dwellings to
ensure homes can be flexibly used by a
range of residents. They also aim to ensure
that space can be sensibly allocated to
different functions, with adequate room
sizes and storage integrated into the
planning. Secondly- Green: Using Renewable Energy
Where feasible, development proposals
should incorporate on-site renewable
energy generation to reduce carbon
dioxide emissions. Renewable energy
generation methods include solar thermal
systems. Thirdly- Limiting noise from external sources
including road, rail and air traffic, and
noise-generating public and business
uses, by orientating sound-sensitive
rooms to face quieter external spaces. Fourthly- the design as a whole uses a
variety of measures to provide adequate
visual and acoustic privacy for every home.
Designers should consider the position and
aspect of habitable rooms, gardens and
balconies, and avoid windows that directly
face each other where privacy distances are
tight. Fifthly- Dwelling plans should demonstrate that
all homes are provided with adequate
space and services to be able to work
from home.
Sixly (I am not sure about the spelling of sixly)-Secured by Design principles should be
incorporated in the design of all private
outdoor spaces. For example, fences and
balconies (as well as communal bins and
cycle stores) should be designed so as not
to provide climbing aids to gain access into
a property.

In today’s life there is no doubt that there is a tremendous rise in demand for home. This phenomenon has urged governments to ask architecture educational institutions and others for designing new dwellings to tackle the need of prospective buyers and residents.
The changes are firstly- The new standards
and guidance are intended to encourage
provision of enough space in dwellings to
ensure homes can be flexibly used by a
range of residents. They also aim to ensure
that space can be sensibly allocated to
different functions, with adequate room
sizes and storage integrated into the
planning. Secondly- Green: Using Renewable Energy
Where feasible, development proposals
should incorporate on-site renewable
energy generation to reduce carbon
dioxide emissions. Renewable energy
generation methods include solar thermal
systems.

Thirdly- Limiting noise from external sources
including road, rail and air traffic, and
noise-generating public and business
uses, by orientating sound-sensitive
rooms to face quieter external spaces. Fourthly- the design as a whole uses a
variety of measures to provide adequate
visual and acoustic privacy for every home.
Designers should consider the position and
aspect of habitable rooms, gardens and
balconies, and avoid windows that directly
face each other where privacy distances are
tight. Fifthly- Dwelling plans should demonstrate that
all homes are provided with adequate
space and services to be able to work
from home.
Sixly (I am not sure about the spelling of sixly)-Secured by Design principles should be
incorporated in the design of all private
outdoor spaces. For example, fences and
balconies (as well as communal bins and
cycle stores) should be designed so as not
to provide climbing aids to gain access into
a property.

Today there is little doubt that there is a tremendous, and rising, demand for homes. This need has prompted governments to ask schools of architecture, as well as other bodies, to promote the design of new dwellings that meet the requirements of today’s prospective buyers, as well as those unable to afford to buy a home of their own.
The changes made are: firstly, a new standard of guidance for developers, one which is intended to encourage the provision of enough dwelling space to ensure that new homes are sufficiently flexible to suit a range of residents. The new standard also seeks to ensure that space can be allocated in a sensibly and appropriate manner and that it is able to fulfil different functions, including therein the provision of adequately sized rooms, with integrated storage as a part of the plan. Secondly, it seeks to promote the use of ‘green’ renewable energy.
Where feasible, developments should incorporate ‘on-site’ generation of renewable energy, and do so with the intention of reducing emissions of carbon dioxide. Such renewable energy may include installing solar thermal systems and, where practicable, means for the local generation of ‘clean’ electricity. Thirdly, the standards seek to limit noise from external sources, including from road, rail, and air traffic, as well as any noise created by local businesses. The intention is to create a ‘sound-sensitive’ dwelling space for residents as well as quieter external spaces. Fourthly, designers are encouraged to use a variety of measures to ensure adequate levels of visual and acoustic privacy for each home.
Designers should consider the position and aspect of each habitable room, the provision of gardens and balconies, and avoid windows directly face one another, particularly where ‘privacy’ is restricted due to the distance between such dwellings. Fifthly, planned dwelling should ensure that all homes contain adequate space, as well as all the services necessary, to enable occupants to work from home. Sixthly, ‘secure by design’ principles should be incorporated as a part of the design of all private, outdoor spaces. For example, fences and balconies, as well as communal bins and cycle stores, should be designed so as not to provide ‘climbing aids’ for those seeking intrusive access to properties.
If these standards and principles are adhered to, we should, in the future, be able to look forward to warmer, more economical, and more secure housing.

hello Simon,
Is home the same with house?because the question for me for task 1 yesterday was "What kind of home do you prefer in the future?"
Thanks.

I mean my question in Part I-Speaking

Hi yna

Yes, it's the same thing.

hello can anyone give me some points for this question.
Cue card
Talk about a wrong decision made by somebody you know. Please say

- What was the decision?
- Why do you think it was wrong?
- Does that person agree or disagree with you now?

Discussion

- Is it better to consult with others before you make decisions?
- Who are the best people to consult with?
- Is it always good to consult with your parents?
- What is the problem with making decisions slowly?
- Is it better to make decisions on the spot without second thought? Why?
- What is the problem when you make emotional decisions?

Hi Simon

I just got my 2 Feb test result. My speaking has improved from 6 to 8.5!! Thanks for your website! It's very helpful!

Please can anyone explain me the sentenc (Having said that....) what is exactly saying. If I consider after That between two commas as a modifier, I get stuck. Indeed, I am not an English native. Please appreciate your kind help.

Hi Simon,

I just finished my speaking test, I am now so worry about that I may not correctly answer the question...would you please give me some advices?

The part 2asked. Describe a traditional event

I spent the whole 2 minutes speaking the Chinese New Year
What people do in Chinese New Year eve
What to do during the new year
Lucky money. Etc...

I worry that Chinese New Year is not a 'event', it is a festival....

Do you think I just screw it up?

Thanks

pEter


Don't worry Peter. That answer is fine.

Hi Simon
I'm very grateful for these useful lessons on your web site
My question is in the conclusion of task 2 do we need to mention what will happened in future (about the topic that given) , or we should not mention any new ideas. Im really confused !!! Please answer my question ASAP . My exam is next week .thanks aloooooooot

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